Please wait...
Contact Us
Contact
Need assistance? Contact us on below numbers

For Study plan details

10:00 AM to 7:00 PM IST all days.

For Franchisee Enquiry

OR

or

Thanks, You will receive a call shortly.
Customer Support

You are very important to us

For any content/service related issues please contact on this number

93219 24448 / 99871 78554

Mon to Sat - 10 AM to 7 PM

the force of buoyancy exerted by the atmosphere on a balloon is B in upward direction and remains constant . the force of air resistance on the balloon acts opposite tom the direction of velocity and is proportional to it .The balloon carries a mass M and is found to fall down near the earths surface with a constant velocity v . How much mass should be removed from the balloon so that it may rise with a constant velocity  v ?

Asked by geethamehs08 19th October 2022, 6:28 PM
Answered by Expert
Answer:
When the balloon is descending with constant speed v , net force acting on balloon is zero
by Newton's second law of motion .
 
Net Force :-  B + ( k v ) - ( M g ) = 0    ..........................(1)
 
 
where B is buoyant force , ( kv) is drag force that is directly proportional to velocity v ,
M is initial quantity of mass carried by the balloon and g is acceleration due to gravity
 
When the balloon is ascending with constant speed v , net force acting on balloon is zero by
Newton's second law of motion .
 
Net Force :-  B  -  ( k v ) - ( m g ) = 0    .........................(2)
 
where  m is the new quantity of mass carried by the balloon and g is acceleration due to gravity.
 
( drag force 'kv' is opposite to the direction of motion )
 
By subtracting eqn.(2) from eqn.(1) , we get
 
2 ( k v ) = ( M - m ) g
 
(M - m ) =  [ 2 (k v ) ] / g
 
Hence , amount of mass to be removed to make the balloon ascending is (M - m ) =  [ 2 (k v ) ] / g
Answered by Expert 20th October 2022, 4:42 PM
Rate this answer
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10

You have rated this answer /10

Your answer has been posted successfully!

Free related questions

24th September 2023, 3:52 PM
2nd October 2023, 1:31 AM
28th October 2021, 11:47 AM

Chat with us on WhatsApp