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speech on "Man vs Machine" about 200 words.

Asked by sonidas002 26th May 2016, 8:26 PM
Answered by Expert
Answer:

In the age of rapid development and industrialisation, one of the most popular and heated debate is that of man versus machine.

Today is no doubt, the age of machine. What a man can produce manually in an entire day can be effortlessly produced by a machine in an hour. This was the one of the many things that triggered automation in the manufacturing industry. It is said that machine is superior to man but in reality, one cannot be of any use without the other.

A machine may produce hundreds of things in a couple of hours. But will it be able to function on its own? Every machine requires a human supervisor. There are robots that perform complex surgeries independently. However, one must not forget that the robotics behind those intricate surgery procedures is established by a robotics engineer.

We need an alarm clock to wake us in the morning. We need a heater that provides us with warm water for our bath. Water is filtered for our use by a machine called an RO purifier.

It is futile to agree which one is better; man or machine. A machine may be fast but it cannot be ingenious like the human mind. Similarly, humans have physical limitations while a machine can function tirelessly for hours together. It would be wise to say that neither of the two, man or machine, is more important. 

Answered by Expert 27th May 2016, 2:26 PM
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