How polar and non-polar covalent compounds are different?

Asked by  | 4th Oct, 2013, 08:24: AM

Expert Answer:

Non-polar covalent bond:

  • Non-polar covalent bond is formed between the two atoms of the same element.
  • Atoms of the same element attract electrons equally.
  • So, when a covalent bond is formed between two atoms of the same element; the electrons are shared equally between the two atoms.
  • In other words, the shared electron-pair will lie exactly midway between the two atoms.
  • This type of covalent bond is known as a non-polar covalent bond.
  • Non-polar covalent bonds are formed in the molecules such as H2, O2 and Cl2 etc.

 Polar covalent bond:

  • Polar covalent bond is formed between two atoms of different elements; the shared pair of electrons does not lie exactly midway between the two atoms and it lies more towards the atom which is more electronegative.
  • The atom with higher affinity for electrons develops a slight negative charge and atom with lesser affinity for electrons a slight positive charge.
  • In the hydrogen chloride (HCl) molecule, hydrogen and chlorine atoms are bonded through electrons sharing.
  • The shared pair of electrons lies more towards Cl atom (because Cl is more electronegative). Therefore, Cl atom acquires a slight negative charge (-?) and H atom, a slight positive charge (+?).

 

Answered by Vaibhav Chavan | 4th Oct, 2013, 08:55: AM

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