HOW ARE PARTHENOGENETICALLY DEVELOPED ORGANISMS DIFFERENT FROM ORGANISMS DEVELOPED FROM SIMPLE FERTILIZATION?

Asked by upmaniousagarika | 7th May, 2016, 12:29: AM

Expert Answer:

Development of an egg (ovum) into a complete individual without fertilisation is called parthenogenesis.

  • Parthenogenetic offspring usually have the diploid chromosome number.
  • Based on the mechanism involved in restoring the diploid number of chromosomes, parthenogenetic offspring may either have all or half of the mother's alleles.
  • The offspring having all of the mother's genetic material are called full clones and those having only half are called half clones.
  • Full clones are usually formed without meiosis. If meiosis occurs, the offspring will get only a fraction of the mother's alleles.
  • Parthenogenetic offspring in species that use either the XY or the X0 sex-determination system have two X chromosomes and are females.
  • In species that use the ZW sex-determination system, they have either two Z chromosomes and are males or two W chromosomes (mostly non-viable, but rarely females), or they could have one Z and one W chromosome (females).

Answered by Sheetal Kolte | 9th May, 2016, 11:28: AM