Holi Celebrations

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Holi Celebration

Holi is mainly celebrated in India, Nepal and Pakistan. Holi is also known as Doul Jatra or Basanta-Utsav. Differences of any sort are drowned in the coloured waters of Holi and people enjoy it like anything.

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Holi Celebration
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Festival of Colours

Colours will fill the atmosphere as people throw abeer and gulal in the air showing great joy and mirth in the arrival of this Spring Festival.

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Festival of Colours
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Kamadeva Myth

It is often believed that it was on this day that Lord Shiva opened his third eye and incinerated Kamadeva, the god of love, to death. So, many people worship Kamadeva on Holi-day, with the simple offering of a mixture of mango blossoms and sandalwood paste. Image Courtesy: dollsofindia.com

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Kamadeva Myth
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Holika and Prahlad

Hiranyakashipu ordered young Prahlada to sit on a pyre on the lap of his demoness sister, Holika, who could not die because she also had a boon. And a boon which would prevent fire from burning her. When the fire started, everyone watched in amazement as Holika burnt to death, while Prahlada survived unharmed, the burning of Holika is celebrated as Holi. Image Courtesy:hindudevotionalpower.blogspot.com

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Holika and Prahlad
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Story of Dhundhi

An ogress called Dhundhi, who was troubling the children in the kingdom of Prthu was chased away by the shouts and pranks of village youngsters. Image Courtesy: news.in.msn.com

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Story of Dhundhi
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Lord Krishna and Radha

Holi is also celebrated in memory of the immortal love of Lord Krishna and Radha. The young Krishna would complain to his mother Yashoda about why Radha was so fair and he so dark. Yashoda advised him to apply colour on Radha's face and see how her complexion would change. Image Courtesy:artoflegendindia.com

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Lord Krishna and Radha
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Braj Holi

In Vrindavan and Mathura, where Lord Krishna grew up, the festival is celebrated for 16 days (until Rangpanchmi) in commemoration of the divine love of Radha for Krishna. Image Courtesy:4to40.com

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Braj Holi
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Birthday of Chaitanya Maha Prabhu

Holi Purnima is also celebrated as the birthday of Shri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu (A.D. 1486-1533). Image Courtesy:socialmania.co.uk

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Birthday of Chaitanya Maha Prabhu
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Holika Dahan

On the eve of Holi, called Chhoti or Small Holi people gather at important crossroads and light huge bonfires, the ceremony is called Holika Dahan. Holika Dahan is symbolic of triumph of good over evil. Image Courtesy:gheecheeni.wordpress.com

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Holika Dahan
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Lathmar Holi

Barsana is the place to be at the time of Holi. Here the famous Lath mar Holi is played in the sprawling compound of the Radha Rani temple. Thousands gather to witness the Lath Mar holi when women beat up men with sticks as those on the sidelines become hysterical, sing Holi Songs and shout Sri Radhey or Sri Krishna. The Holi songs of Braj mandal are sung in pure Braj Bhasha. Image Courtesy:blog.mahindrahomestays.com

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Lathmar Holi
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Rangapanchami

People of Maharashtra commonly know this festival of colours by the name of Rangpanchami as the play of colours is reserved for the fifth day here. Locals of Maharashtra also know Holi as Shimga or Shimgo. Image Courtesy:padmanch.org

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Rangapanchami
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Traditional Holi

Traditionally, the Holi is celebrated by throwing natural colours made up of Neem, Kumkum, Haldi, Bilva. Also a special drink called thandai is prepared (commonly made of almonds, pistachios, rose petals, etc.), sometimes containing bhang. Image Courtesy:pingmag.jp

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Traditional Holi
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Bura na mano holi hain

During Holi, practices, which at other times could be offensive, are allowed. Squirting colored water on passers-by, dunking friends in mud pool amidst teasing and laughter, getting intoxicated on bhaang and revelling with companions is perfectly acceptable. In fact, on the days of Holi, you can get away with almost anything by saying, "Don't mind, it's Holi!". Image Courtesy:pzsongszone.com

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Bura na mano holi hain
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Flame of the forest

The colours of Holi, called 'gulal', in the medieval times were made at home, from the flowers of the 'tesu' or 'palash' tree, also called 'the flame of the forest'. Image Courtesy:theflowerexpert.com

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Flame of the forest
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