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Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity

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Frank Textbook Solutions Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity

Frank Textbook Solutions are considered extremely helpful for solving difficult questions in the ICSE Class 10 Physics exam. TopperLearning Textbook Solutions are compiled by our subject experts. Herein, you can find all the answers to the questions of   Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity for the Frank textbook.

Frank Textbook Solutions for class 10 are in accordance with the latest ICSE syllabus, and they are amended from time to time to be most relevant. Our free Frank Textbook Solutions for ICSE Class 10 Physics will give you deeper insight on the chapters and will help you to score more marks in the final examination. ICSE Class 10 students can refer to our solutions while doing their homework and while preparing for the exam.

 

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Exercise/Page

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 223

Solution 1

(a)
(i) 2/3 A
(b)
(ii) double in value
(c)
(iv) ohmic conductors
(d)
(iv) 6 ?
(e)
(ii) voltage
(f)
(i) protect the user from electric shock by short circuiting and consequently breaking the circuit.
(g)
(iii) A 13 ampere fuse is the most suitable rating to use

Solution 2

(a) Potential difference: The potential difference between two points may be defined as the work done in moving a unit positive charge from one point to the other.
(b) (i) Coulomb: It is the unit of charge.
(ii) Ohm: It is the unit of resistance. The resistance of a conductor is said to be 1 ohm, if 1 ampere current flows through it, when the potential difference across its ends is 1 volt.
(c) Electromotive force: When no current is drawn from a cell, when the cell is in open circuit, the potential difference between the terminals of the cell is called its electromotive force (or e.m.f.).
(d) Semiconductors: Substances whose resistance decreases with the increase in temperature are named as semiconductors. E.g. manganin, constantan etc.
(e) Superconductors: Substance whose resistance decreases tremendously with the decrease in temperature and reaches nearly zero around absolute zero temperature are named as superconductors; e.g. lead, tin etc.

Solution 3

According to Ohm's law, the current flowing in a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference across its ends provided the physical conditions and temperature of conductor remains constant.
Limitations of Ohm's law:
1. Ohm's law does not apply to conductors such as diode, radio valves, metal rectifiers, where electricity passes through gases.
2. Ohm's law is applicable only when the physical conditions remain constant.
3. Ohm's law is applicable only when the temperature of the conductor is constant.

Solution 4

Factors on which the resistance of a conductor depends are:
(i) Nature of conductor: different materials have different concentration of free electrons and therefore resistance of a conductor depends on its material.
(ii) Length of conductor: Resistance of a conductor is directly proportional to the length of a conductor.
(iii) Area of cross-section of a conductor: Resistance of a conductor is inversely proportional to the area of cross-section of the uniform wire.
(iv) Temperature of conductor: In general for metallic conductors, higher the temperature larger is the resistance.
Materials which allow electric charges to flow through them easily are known as conductors. E.g. metals and materials which do not allow the electric charge to flow through them are known as insulators. E.g. rubber, dry wood etc.

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 224

Solution 5


Functions:
(A) Cell- It provides the potential difference in the circuit.
(B) Key- It serves as a switch in the circuit. It supplies or cuts off current as required.
(C) Ammeter- It measures the current in the circuit.
(D) Rheostat- It helps to change the resistance of the circuit without changing its voltage.
(E) Resistor- It provides a constant resistance in the circuit.
(F) Voltmeter- It measure the potential drop across the resistor.

Solution 6

Solution 7

Solution 8

Solution 9

Solution 10

Solution 11

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 225

Solution 12

Solution 13

Solution 14

Solution 15

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 226

Solution 16

Solution 17

Solution 18

Solution 19

Solution 20

Solution 21

Solution 22

Solution 23

(a) Brown wire or live wire should be connected to terminal C.
Blue wire or neutral wire should be connected to terminal B.
Green wire or earth wire should be connected to terminal A.
(b) No, current passes through the earth terminal i.e. terminal A in normal circumstances.
(c) The metal case of an electrical appliance is earthed so that in any case of accidental contact of live wire with the metallic body of the appliance, the earth wire would provide a safe and easy path for the electric charges to flow down to the earth which acts as very large sink. Thus, user is thereby protected from any fatal electric shock.

Solution 24

'kilowatt-hour' is the commercial unit of electricity. One kilo-watt hour is the electrical energy consumed by an electrical appliance of power 1 kW when it is used for 1 hour.

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 227

Solution 25

Construction and working of filament bulb
List of materials used:
Light bulbs have two metal contacts, which connect to the ends of an electrical circuit. The metal contacts are attached to two stiff wires, which are attached to a thin metal filament. The filament sits in the middle of the bulb, held up by a glass mount. The wires and the filament are housed in a glass bulb, which is filled with an inert gas, such as argon.

When the bulb is connected to a power supply, an electric current flows from one contact to the other, through the wires and the filament.
As the electrons zip along through the filament, they are constantly bumping into the atoms that make up the filament. The energy of each impact vibrates an atom -- in other words, the current heats the atoms up.
Metal atoms release mostly infrared light photons, which are invisible to the human eye. But if they are heated to a high enough level -- around 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit  in the case of a light bulb -- they will emit a good deal of visible light.
Tungsten is used in nearly all incandescent light bulbs because it is an ideal filament material.
In a modern light bulb, inert gases, typically argon, greatly reduce this loss of tungsten. At  extreme temperatures, the occasional tungsten atom vibrates enough to detach from the atoms around it and flies into the air resulting in its evaporation. In the rpesence of argon gas around it, the chances are that it will collide with an argon atom and bounce right back toward the filament, where it will rejoin the solid structure. Also since inert gases normally don't react with other elements, there is no chance of the elements combining in a combustion reaction.

Solution 26

Solution 27

(a) Connecting wires: Materials having low resistance low resistivity and high melting point e.g. copper, aluminium.
(b) Fuse wire: Materials having high resistance and low melting point e.g. solder an alloy of lead and tin.
(c) Heating element: Materials having high resistivity and high melting point e.g. tungsten.
(d) Connecting wire of a power line: Materials having low resistance and non-corosive properties e.g. high tension wires.
(e) Earthing elements: Materials which are good conductors of electricity. Earthing elements are copper wire, copper plate, salt.

Solution 28

Solution 29

Solution 30

Solution 31

(a) The ring system consists of a ring of three wires namely live wire, earth wire and neutral wire, which originate from the main fuse box and after running around the rooms in the house comes back to the main fuse box, thus, completing a ring. In ring system, a separate connection is taken from the live wire of the ring for each appliance. In the ring circuit, all appliances are connected in parallel.

(b) Advantages of a parallel connection are:
(i) In parallel arrangement, each appliance works at the same voltage. For example, if several bulbs are connected in parallel, each bulb glows at the same voltage. Therefore, the glow of a bulb is unaffected if another bulb is switched on or off.
(ii) In parallel arrangement, if one bulb (or appliance

Solution 32

Solution 33

When no current is drawn from the cell i.e. when the cell is in open circuit, the potential difference between the terminals of the cell is called its electromotive force (or e.m.f).

Solution 34

Solution 35

Solution 36

Solution 37

Incorrect statement:
(a) A 13A fuse is the most appropriate value to use

Solution 38

(i) A transformer works on the principle of electromagnetic induction.
(ii) Function of a step-up transformer is to increase the a.c. voltage and decrease the current.
(iii) No, a transformer cannot work on a d.c. source. With a d.c. source, there will be no change in magnetic flux linked with the secondary coil.

Solution 39

(i) Current at the end B of the coil X is anticlockwise therefore at this end there is north pole.
(ii) While closing the key, polarity at the end C of the coil Y will be north. There will be no polarity at the end C of the coil Y when the current becomes steady in the coil X.
(iii) (a) While the coil Y is moved towards the coil X, the polarity at the end C of the coil Y is north.
(b) While the coil Y is moved away the coil X, the polarity at the end C of the coil Y is south.

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 228

Solution 40

(a) (i) When the magnet is moved rapidly in the direction of arrow, the magnetic flux linked with the coil changes and there is a deflection in the galvanometer, indicating a flow of current through the coil.
(ii) On keeping the magnet still, the magnetic flux linked with the coil does not change and there is no deflection in the galvanometer, indicating that no current is flowing through the coil.
(iii) When the magnet is rapidly pulled out, there is again change in the magnetic flux linked with the coil and the galvanometer shows a deflection but this time in opposite direction, indicating that a current is flowing in opposite direction in the coil.
(b) If a more powerful magnet is used, deflection in the galvanometer will be large, indicating a greater amount of current.

Solution 41

(a) (v) left left  left
(b) (ii) repulsion and attraction respectively
(c) (i) connecting a large resistor in series
(d) (iv) upwards and perpendicular to XY
(e) (i) 250 V

Solution 42

(a) Plastic being non-magnetic cannot be used as a material for core. It shall not intensify the formed magnetic field.
(b) Steel has high retentivity. Hence, after prolonged use even when the switch is off, it may retain some magnetic property and attract the armature.
(c) Using copper as a material for core will introduce eddy currents in the core and thus, interfere with the working of the bell.

Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 229

Solution 43

Solution 44

Solution 45

(i) This is due to change in magnetic flux in the coil. Due to change in magnetic flux an induced emf is produced in the coil. Hence, a current flows through the galvanometer.
(ii) The current appears anticlockwise when viewed from end A because end A will form north-pole.
(iii) The galvanometer now deflects towards left.
(iv) No deflection is observed as there is no relative motion between the magnet and the coil.

Solution 46

Solution 47

A moving coil galvanometer can be converted into an ammeter by connecting a low resistance (called a shunt) in parallel to the galvanometer.
A moving coil galvanometer can be converted into a voltmeter by connecting a high resistance in series with the galvanometer.

Solution 48

An ammeter is a low resistance device; hence it is connected in series.
A voltmeter is a high resistance device; hence it is connected in parallel.

Solution 49


Frank Modern Certificate Solution for Class 10 Physics Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity Page/Excercise 230

Solution 50

(a) We will observe that the needle of the galvanometer instantly jumps to one side and just as quickly returns to zero, indicating a momentary current in coil connected to galvanometer.
(b) Introducing an iron bar in the tube, will increase the amount of induced current and the galvanometer will show a greater deflection.

Solution 51

Solution 52

Solution 53

It is a diagram of step-down transformer.
(a) Brightness of bulb will increase because increasing the number of turns in the secondary will increase the change in magnetic flux linked with the coil.
(b) Part X is the core of the transformer is removed, it shall become an open core and there shall be magnetic flux link loss; i.e. the entire magnetic field lines produced by the primary shall not be linked with the secondary.
(c) If the core of the transformer is made of copper due to the formation of eddy currents a lot of energy shall be lost.
(d) A transformer cannot be used with direct current (d.c.) since its working is based on the principle that when there is a change of magnetic field lines due to varying current of same in one coil, an induced varying current of same frequency flows in the other coil. If the current in one coil is constant (i.e. d.c.), no induced current will flow in the other coil since there will be no change in the magnetic field lines linked with the coil.

Solution 54

Solution 55

Features which provide greater efficiency to a transformer are:
(i) The core of the transformer is laminated which prevents the formation of eddy currents.
(ii) A closed soft-iron core is used which reduces the magnetic field link loss and hysteresis loss.

Solution 56

(a) magnet - soft iron
(b) core- soft iron
(c) core- soft iron, magnet - steel
(d) core- soft iron, magnet - steel
(e) core-soft iron

Solution 57

Solution 58

Solution 59

Solution 60

The ratio of number of turns NS in secondary coil to the number of turns NP in the primary coil (NS / NP) is called the turns ratio.
A transformer cannot be used with direct current (d.c.) since its working is based on the principle that when there is a change of magnetic field lines due to varying current of same in one coil, an induced varying current of same frequency flows in the other coil. If the current in one coil is constant (i.e. d.c.), no induced current will flow in the other coil since there will be no change in the magnetic field lines linked with the coil.

Frank Modern Certificate Physics - Part II Class 10 Chapter Solutions

TopperLearning provides step-by-step solutions for each question in each chapter in the Frank textbook recommended by ICSE schools. Access Chapter Unit - 4 - Current Electricity here. Our Frank Textbook Solutions for ICSE Class 10 Physics are designed by our subject matter experts. These solutions will help you to revise the whole chapter, so you can clear your fundamentals before the examination.

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