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NCERT Solution for Class 10 Geography Chapter 3 - Water Resources

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NCERT Textbook Solutions are considered extremely helpful when preparing for your CBSE Class 10 Geography board exams. TopperLearning study resources infuse profound knowledge, and our Textbook Solutions compiled by our subject experts are no different. Here you will find all the answers to the NCERT textbook questions of Chapter 3 - Water Resources.

All our solutions for Chapter 3 - Water Resources are prepared considering the latest CBSE syllabus, and they are amended from time to time. Our free NCERT Textbook Solutions for CBSE Class 10 Geography will strengthen your fundamentals in this chapter and can help you to score more marks in the examination. Refer to our Textbook Solutions any time, while doing your homework or while preparing for the exam.

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NCERT Solution for Class 10 Geography Chapter 3 - Water Resources Page/Excercise 33

Question 1

Multiple choice questions
(i) Based on the information given below classify each of the situations as 'suffering from water scarcity' or 'not suffering from water scarcity'.
(a) Region with high annual rainfall.

(b) Region having high annual rainfall and large population.

(c) Region having high annual rainfall but water is highly polluted.

(d) Region having low rainfall and low population.


(ii) Which one of the following statements is not an argument in favour of multi-purpose river projects?
(a) Multi-purpose projects bring water to those areas which suffer from water scarcity.

(b) Multi-purpose projects by regulating water flow help to control floods.

(c) Multi-purpose projects lead to large scale displacements and loss of livelihood.

(d) Multi-purpose projects generate electricity for our industries and our homes.


(iii) Here are some false statements. Identify the mistakes and rewrite them correctly.
(a) Multiplying urban centres with large and dense populations and urban lifestyles have helped in proper utilisation of water resources.

(b) Regulating and damming of rivers does not affect the river's natural flow and its sediment flow.

(c) In Gujarat, the Sabarmati basin farmers were not agitated when higher priority was given to water supply in urban areas, particularly during droughts.

(d) Today in Rajasthan, the practice of rooftop rainwater water harvesting has gained popularity despite high water availability due to the Rajasthan Canal.

Solution 1

(i) (a) Not suffering from water scarcity

(b) Suffering from water scarcity

(c) Suffering from water scarcity

(d) Not suffering from water scarcity

(ii) (c) Multi-purpose projects lead to large scale displacements and loss of livelihood.

(iii) (a) Multiplying urban centres with large and dense populations and urban lifestyles have caused the over exploitation of water resources.

(b) Regulating and damming of rivers affect their natural flow and causes the sediment to settle at the bottom of the reservoir.

(c) In Gujarat, the Sabarmati basin farmers were agitated when higher priority was given to water supply in urban areas, particularly during droughts.

(d) Today in Rajasthan, the practice of rooftop rainwater harvesting is on the decline due to theavailability of water from the Rajasthan Canal.

Question 2

Answer the following questions in about 30 words.
(i) Explain how water becomes a renewable resource.
(ii) What is water scarcity and what are its main causes?

(iii) Compare the advantages and disadvantages of multipurpose river projects. 

Solution 2

(i) Water is a renewable resource as fresh water mainly obtained from surface run off and ground water  is continually being renewed and recharged by the water /hydrological cycle itself.

In hydrological cycle three processes take place - evaporation, condensation and precipitation. This process of the water cycle is never ending and hence, water is a renewable resource.


(ii) Scarcity of water means shortage of water, an imbalance between demand and supply.

Causes or the factors responsible for water scarcity are as follows:
1. A large and growing population is the main cause of water scarcity. More water is required for domestic purposes and for growing food.
2. Urbanization and industrialization have increased the consumption of water.
3. Wastage, excessive use and injudicious use of water.
4. Over-exploitation and mismanagement of water resources.
5. Unequal access to water resources.
6. In post green revolution era,  more water intensive commercial crops are grown that consume more water.  
7. Pollution of water by domestic and industrial waste, chemicals, pesticides, fertilizers used in agriculture etc.

(iii) The various advantages and disadvantages of multipurpose river projects can be compared as follows

Advantages

Disadvantages

Irrigation

 

Electricity generation

Water supply for industrial and domestic purposes

Flood control

 

Amusement

Inland navigation

Fish breeding

Natural flow of river is affected causing poor sediment flow .

Excessive sedimentation at the bottom of the reservoir

Stream beds become rockier.

Poor habitats for river aquatic life.

Dams  fragment a river making it difficult for aquatic fauna to migrate especially for spawning

Reservoirs on flood plains submerge the existing vegetation and soil leading to its decomposition over time.

Deforestation and large scale displacement of local people along with loss of their land, livelihood and access and control over resources.

Change in cropping pattern with a shift to water intensive and commercial crops resulting in ecological consequences like salinisation of soil.

Created a social gap between the rich landowners and landless poor.

 

 

Question 3

Answer the following questions in about 120 words.
(i) Discuss how rainwater harvesting in semi arid regions of Rajasthan is carried out.

(ii) Describe how modern adaptations of traditional rainwater harvesting methods are being carried out to conserve and store water.

Solution 3

i) In semi arid regions of Rajasthan rainwater harvesting is carried out in the following manner:

In the arid and semi arid regions of Rajasthan, most of the houses have tanks which are built underground for storing water. Some of these underground tanks may be as large as a big room. These tanks were constructed inside the house or in courtyard. Water in the tank was collected through pipes which were installed on the sloping roofs of the house. This stored rain water was mainly utilised during the summer months especially when other sources of water would dry up.

(ii) Rainwater harvesting means capturing rain when it falls. It is done to meet the increasing demand of water and also to recharge the ground water. People living in rural and urban areas have realized the importance of traditional rainwater harvesting methods like the rooftop storing method and this has been successfully adapted to store and conserve water. The level of underground water in most urban areas has fallen  because of increasing population, industrialization etc.
In Gendathur village, Mysore, about 200 households have adopted the rooftop rainwater harvesting method, making the village 'rich in rainwater. With 80% collection efficiency each house can collect about 50,000 litres annually. The Tamil Nadu government has made it compulsory for all the houses to have rooftop rainwater harvesting structures. 
It is also the most common practice in Shillong and Meghalaya.

(i) In semi arid regions of Rajasthan rainwater harvesting is carried out in their own manner. Houses have traditionally constructed underground tanks or ‘tankas’ for storing rainwater which they use for drinking and other purposes. These are big and are a part of well-developed rooftop rainwater harvesting system. These tanks are constructed inside the main house or the courtyard and are connected to the sloping roofs of the houses through a pipe. The rain falling on the rooftop travels down through the pipe and is stored in the tanks (tankas). The first spell of rain is not collected as this water cleans the roof and pipes.

During summer when all other sources of water dry up, these tanks remain the best source of water. The water is sweet and cool here and also help in keeping the houses cool due to conduction.  

(ii) Rainwater harvesting means capturing rain when it falls. It is done to meet the increasing demand of water as also to recharge the ground water. People living in urban areas have realized the importance of traditional rainwater harvesting methods like the rooftop storing method. The level of underground water in most of the urban areas has gone down much because of the increasing population, industrialization etc.

In Gendathur village, Mysore, about 200 households have adopted the rooftop rainwater harvesting method, thereby making village rich in rainwater. The Tamil Nadu government has made it compulsory for all the houses to have rooftop rainwater harvesting structures.  

 

TopperLearning provides step-by-step solutions for each question in each chapter in the NCERT textbook. Access Chapter 3 - Water Resources here for free.

Our NCERT Solutions for Class 10 Geography are by our subject matter experts. These NCERT Textbook Solutions will help you to revise the whole chapter, and you can increase your knowledge of Geography. If you would like to know more, please get in touch with our counsellor today!

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