Question
Wed June 04, 2008 By:

Where are esters naturally found?

Expert Reply
Thu June 05, 2008

Lutein esters found in flower petals is chemically bound to various types of fatty acids.oils of vegetables and seeds such as soybeans, grapeseed, sunflower seed, and corn has sterol esters.

Esters are derived from carboxylic acids. A carboxylic acid contains the -COOH group, and in an ester the hydrogen in this group is replaced by a hydrocarbon group of some kind. This could be an alkyl group like methyl or ethyl, or one containing a benzene ring like phenyl

The acid CH3(CH2)16COOH is called octadecanoic acid, but the old name is still commonly used. This is stearic acid.

The full name for the ester of this with propane-1,2,3-triol is propane-1,2,3-triyl trioctadecanoate. But the truth is that almost everybody calls it (not surprisingly!) by its old name of glyceryl tristearate.

The acid CH3(CH2)16COOH is called octadecanoic acid, but the old name is still commonly used. This is stearic acid.

The full name for the ester of this with propane-1,2,3-triol is propane-1,2,3-triyl trioctadecanoate. But the truth is that almost everybody calls it (not surprisingly!) by its old name of glyceryl tristearate.

The acid CH3(CH2)16COOH is called octadecanoic acid, but the old name is still commonly used. This is stearic acid.

The full name for the ester of this with propane-1,2,3-triol is propane-1,2,3-triyl trioctadecanoate. But the truth is that almost everybody calls it (not surprisingly!) by its old name of glyceryl tristearate.

 
 
 
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