Question
Thu March 12, 2015 By: Harshita Singh

can you help me with some good startings in formal letter?

Expert Reply
Snehal Naik
Fri March 13, 2015
Hi Harshita, 
 
A formal letter is written in a formal language with a specific structure and a layout. A formal letter should 
  • be in the correct format
  • be short and precise 
  • free of grammatical errors
  • polite
  • well-presented

Some good beginnings to a formal letter are as follows:

With reference to your letter of 8 March, I ...

I am writing to enquire about ...

After having seen your advertisement in ... , I would like ...

We/I recently wrote to you about ...

Thank you for your letter of 8 March.

Thank you for your letter regarding ...

In reply to your letter of 8 May, ...

If you require any further information, feel free to contact me.

Some good endings to a formal letter are as follows:

I look forward to your reply.

I look forward to hearing from you.

I look forward to seeing you.

Please advise as necessary.

If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Once again, I apologise for any inconvenience.

We hope that we may continue to rely on your service.

I would appreciate your immediate attention to this matter.

I hope the above information helps. 

Happy Studying! 

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