when current is drawn from cell why current always travel from cathode to anode inside the electrolyte?

Asked by nitin | 2nd Nov, 2012, 01:27: PM

Expert Answer:

When a chemical reaction occurs in the solution, electrons gather on cathode, which becomes negatively charged. At the same time, electrons are drawn from the anode, giving it a positive charge. The difference in charge sets up a potential difference, or voltage, between the two electrodes. When they are connected by a conducting wire, electrons flow from the cathode to the anode, producing a current.  When a chemical reaction occurs in the solution,electrons gather on cathode, which becomes negatively charged. At the same time, electrons are drawn from the anode, giving it a positive charge. The difference in charge sets up a potential difference, or voltage, between the two electrodes. When they are connected by a conducting wire, electrons flow from the cathode to the anode, producing  current.

Answered by  | 2nd Nov, 2012, 04:42: PM

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