Lipids are part of the acid-insoluble fraction, but they are not strictly macromolecules. Justify.

Asked by Topperlearning User | 17th Jul, 2014, 04:10: PM

Expert Answer:

Lipids are low molecular weight compounds.

They are present in cell membranes and other membranes of the cell.

While grinding the tissue with the trichloroacetic acid, the membranes are broken into pieces and form vesicles which are not water soluble.

These vesicles of the membrane fragments get separated with the acid-insoluble pool and come with the macromolecular fraction.

Hence, although lipids are part of the acid-insoluble fraction, they are not strictly macromolecules.

Answered by  | 17th Jul, 2014, 06:10: PM