If we add a very small quantity iof solute in a saturated solution at given conditions of temprature and pressure, will it dissolve or not ? It is provided that there is no amount of solid solute in the container in which the above process in being carried.
I mean to say that if there is no solid solute particle inside the solution then how will the solute particles in the solution will collide and crystallise. And therefore how the equilibrium will be eastablished between dissolution crystallisation as in a saturated solution. 

Asked by shaktiisgreat000 | 23rd Aug, 2014, 04:18: PM

Expert Answer:

Dear shaktiisgreat000@gmail.com

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We have not understood the query that you have posted. We would request you to clarify / provide additional details so that we may answer this to the best of the ability.
 
''I mean to say that if there is no solid solute particle inside the solution then how will the solute particles in the solution will collide and crystallise. And therefore how the equilibrium will be eastablished between dissolution crystallisation as in a saturated solution.''
 
However, answer to your query from which we have understood is,

When the solution is saturated, the solvent has dissolved the maximum amount of solute that it can at the given temperature. At this point we say that the solution is in a state of dynamic equilibrium—the processes of dissolving and precipitation are happening at the same rate.

A supersaturated solution is one in which the solvent contains more solute than it can theoretically hold at a given temperature. Supersaturated solutions are often formed by heating a solution and dissolving more solute, then cooling the solution down slowly. These solutions are unstable and crystallize readily.

 
Regards

Topperlearning Team.

Answered by Hanisha Vyas | 25th Aug, 2014, 12:42: PM