I CANNOT INDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN DOUBLE DISPLACMENT AND DISPLACMENT REACTION.

Asked by  | 19th May, 2008, 10:44: PM

Expert Answer:

Dear student,

A single-displacement reaction, also called single-replacement reaction, is when an element or ion moves out of one compound and into another. (One element is replaced by another in a compound.) This is usually written as

A + BX → AX + B or A + BX → AB + X

This will occur if A is more reactive than B. You can refer to the reactivity series to be sure of this.

Example :

The reaction between silver nitrate, AgNO3, and zinc, Zn, forms silver, Ag, and zinc nitrate, Zn(NO3)2.

2AgNO3(aq) + Zn(s) → 2Ag(s) + Zn(NO3)2(aq)

Double displacement reaction is a bimolecular process involving the exchange of bonds between the two reacting chemical species, which results in the creation of products with similar or identical bonding affiliations.To illustrate, consider two chemical species, AB and CD, which react to give AD and CB:

AB + CD → AD + CB

Example:

A neutralisation reaction is a specific type of double displacement reaction. Neutralization occurs when an acid reacts with an equal amount of a base. A neutralization reaction creates a solution of salt and water; for example:

HCl(aq) + NaOH(aq) → NaCl(aq) + H2O(l)

 

Answered by  | 14th Jun, 2008, 04:18: PM

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