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CBSE Class 10 Answered

Explain the processes of glycogenesis and glycogenolysis.
Asked by somyap | 30 Apr, 2010, 01:01: PM
Expert Answer

Glycogenesis is the formation of glycogen from glucose. Glycogen is synthesized depending on the demand for glucose and ATP (energy). If both are present in relatively high amounts, then the excess of insulin promotes the glucose conversion into glycogen for storage in liver and muscle cells.

 

In glycogenolysis, glycogen stored in the liver and muscles, is converted first to glucose-1- phosphate and then into glucose-6-phosphate. Glycogen is a highly branched polymeric structure containing glucose as the basic monomer. First individual glucose molecules are hydrolyzed from the chain, followed by the addition of a phosphate group at C-1. In the next step the phosphate is moved to the C-6 position to give glucose 6-phosphate, a cross road compound. If energy is not immediately needed, the glucose-6-phosphate is converted to glucose for distribution in the blood to various cells. Glucagon from the pancreas and epinephrine from the adrenal glands are hormones controlling glycogenolysis.

Answered by | 03 May, 2010, 08:32: AM
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