History of the glass bottle soda

Image
02

Spring water

The first recorded history leading up to our modern soft drinks began with the discovery of natural mineral waters created by the flow of water through rocks and soil where mineral salts are dissolved. As the Roman Empire expanded, many of the renowned springs of England, Germany, Belgium, and Italy were used for their miracle medicinal cures. Image Courtesy: images.paraorkut.com

01
Spring water
02

Spring's & Spa's

In Europe beginning in the late seventeen hundreds, it became fashionable to visit the natural springs to either drink of the 'healthful' waters or to bathe in them. Spas were also becoming popular in the New World, and as early as 1767, the waters of Jackson's Spa in Boston were bottled and sold to satisfy a rapidly growing demand for its therapeutic miracles. Image Courtesy: www.blogspot.com

01
Spring's & Spa's
02

1st carbonated soft drink

In 1767, an English scientist named Joseph Priestly in one of his experiments, found that the water easily absorbed gas, later identified as carbon dioxide, the same thing we call 'fizzz'. It is believed that the first carbonated soft drink was made in Philadelphia in 1807 by Dr. Philip Syng Physick, the father of American Surgery. Later flavor was added to make the drink more palatable. The main problem at the dawn of soda pop was finding a way to add natural juices to carbonated water without fermentation the drink. Image Courtesy: www.sciencephoto.com / www.hubimg.com

01
1st carbonated soft drink
02

Glass Bottle

The glass bottle had its humble beginnings in Syria about 100 years before Christ when the art of blowing air through a hollow tube into a blob of molten glass forming a hollow vessel was discovered. The early bottles were hand blown and rather crude compared with later machine made bottles. The first bottles used for mineral and soda waters were called blob tops. Image Courtesy: www.sha.org

01
Glass Bottle
02

Bottle seal

In the early days of mineral waters, the closure of choice was the cork stopper. In order to maintain a proper seal, it was necessary to keep the cork stopper moist. One of the methods used most commonly in Europe was to invert the bottle to keep the liquid in continuous contact with the cork. The bottoms of the bottles were rounded to prevent them from standing upright. Image Courtesy: www.bertkilbride.com

01
Bottle seal
02

Hutchinson's stopper

Even the seals were being experimented on. Finally in 1879, Charles G. Hutchinson, the son of a prominent Chicago bottler invented a spring type internal bottle closure known as the 'Hutchinson Stopper' whose popularity during the period made it almost a standard. In fact, so many were used that the bottles produced during the years to follow are referred to as "Hutchinson Bottles". Image Courtesy: www.glswrk-auction.com

01
Hutchinson's stopper
02

Crown cork seal

In 1892, William Painter, a Baltimore machine shop operator made the crown cork bottle seal, an invention that quickly became a standard for the industry and replaced over a thousand different types of bottle sealing devices in use at the time. Image Courtesy: www.blogspot.com

01
Crown cork seal
02

Automatic bottle making machines

In 1903, the first successful automatic bottle blowing machine was put in operation by its inventor, Michael J. Owens. By 1910, the new machines were producing over 57,000 bottles a day, a dramatic improvement over the 1500 bottles per day produced by hand. These automatic bottle machine bottles are sometimes referred to as ABM bottles to separate them from the blob top and Hutchinson bottle era. Image Courtesy: www.toledoblade.com

01
Automatic bottle making machines
02

Labeling

The earliest form of labeling was embossing where raised glass letters was created as part of the bottle mold. This label was used primarily as a means of getting the bottle returned for refills. As labeling machines, better glues, and improved printing techniques evolved more bottlers began to use paper labels to identify their soda brands. In 1934, the bottling industry made first use of Applied Color Label. Image Courtesy: www.bottlebooks.com

01
Labeling
02

Recent times

Subsequent years have seen improvements in the methods of packaging, sealing & labeling. Now we have the automatic vending machines and the tin cans of soda. Image Courtesy: www.imimg.com / www.img.21food.com

01
Recent times
Share facebook twitter gplus

Related Slideshows