World's Most Venomous Snakes

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Cobra

Indian Cobra (Naja naja) or Spectacled Cobra is a species of the genus Naja found in the Indian subcontinent. The Indian cobra's venom acts on the synaptic gaps of the nerves, thereby paralyzing muscles, and in severe bites leading to respiratory failure or cardiac arrest.

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Cobra
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Common Krait

Kraits are nocturnal and seldom encounter humans during daylight hours, so incidents are rare. There is frequently little or no pain from a krait bite and this can provide false reassurance to the victim. Typically, victims complain of severe abdominal cramps, accompanied by progressive paralysis. The Indian krait's venom consists mostly of powerful neurotoxins which induce muscle paralysis.

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Common Krait
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Russell's Viper

It is one of the species responsible for causing the most snakebite incidents and deaths among all venomous snakes. The color pattern consists of a deep yellow, tan or brown ground color, with three series of dark brown spots that run the length of its body.The head is flattened, triangular and distinct from the neck.

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Russell's Viper
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Saw Scaled Viper

The Saw-scaled viper is one of the species which are responsible for causing the most snakebite cases and deaths due to various factors such as their frequently occurrences in high populated regions and their inconspicuousness nature. Its characteristic pose, a double coil with a figure of eight, with the head poised in the center, permits it to lash out like a released spring. Head distinct from neck, snout very short and rounded.

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Saw Scaled Viper
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Puff Adder

Found in all habitats except true deserts, rain forests, and tropical habitats. Most often associated with rocky grasslands. When agitated, they can resort to a typical serpentine movement and move with surprising speed. If disturbed, they will hiss loudly and continuously, adopting a tightly coiled defensive posture with the fore part of their body held in a taut "S" shape. They may strike suddenly and at a high speed, to the side as easily as forwards, before returning quickly to the defensive position, ready to strike again.

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Puff Adder
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Rattlesnake

All native to the Americas. Each time the snake sheds its skin, a new rattle segment is added. Some rattlesnake species hibernate in the colder winter months. They often gather together for hibernation in very large numbers (sometimes over 1,000 snakes), huddling together inside of underground "rattlesnake dens."

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Rattlesnake
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Black Mamba

Is the longest venomous snake in Africa. Its name is derived from the black coloration inside the mouth rather than the actual color of its scales which varies from dull yellowish-green to a gun-metal grey. It is the fastest snake in the world, capable of moving at 4.32 to 5.4 meters per second. It has a reputation for being aggressive and highly venomous.

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Black Mamba
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Golden Lancehead

A venomous pitviper species found only on Ilha da Queimada Grande, off the coast of Sao Paulo state, in Brazil. The species is named for the light yellowish brown color of its underside and for its head shape which is unique.

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Golden Lancehead
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Coral Snake

Coral snakes are most notable for their red, yellow/white, and black colored banding. Coral snakes have a powerful neurotoxin that paralyzes the breathing muscles; mechanical or artificial respiration.

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Coral Snake
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Taipan

The taipans are a genus of large, fast, highly venomous Australasian snake. It is among the third most venomous land snake in the world.

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Taipan
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Sea Snake

Most are extensively adapted to a fully aquatic life and are unable to move on land. They are found in warm coastal waters from the Indian Ocean to the Pacific. All have paddle-like tails and many have laterally compressed bodies that give them an eel-like appearance. Unlike fish, they do not have gills and must surface regularly to breathe. This group is some of the most potent venom's of all snakes.

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Sea Snake
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