Mahavir-Life and Teachings

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings

Mahavir as a child had shown great physical prowess and intellectual acumen too but he renounced the worldly pleasures at the young age of 30.

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings
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Mahavira-Life and Teachings

He led a life of intense penance for over twelve years and finally got self-illumined.

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings
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Mahavira-Life and Teachings

After attaining knowledge, he preached the truths of life and emphasized `Unity of Life’ forms.

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings
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Mahavira-Life and Teachings

His teachings made him God Mahavira for Jain community.

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings
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Mahavira-Life and Teachings

He was the great reformer of Jain religion who made it a a scientific and compassionate religion.

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Mahavira-Life and Teachings
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Mahavir Swami gave five code of conducts that a true Jain must follow. These include:

Ahimsa (Non Violence)- to cause "no harm" to living beings (on the lines of "live" and "let live"). The vow involves "minimizing" intentional as well as unintentional harm to another living creature. There should even be no room for any thought conjuring injury to others, let alone talking about it or performing of such an act.

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Mahavir Swami gave five code of conducts that a true Jain must follow. These include:
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Satya

Satya (Truth)- to always speak of truth such that no harm is caused to others. A person who speaks truth becomes trustworthy like a mother, venerable like a preceptor and dear to everyone like a kinsman. Given that non-violence has priority, all other principles yield to it whenever there is a conflict. For example, in a situation where speaking truth would lead to violence, it would be perfectly moral to remain silent (for you are neither being untrue, nor causing violence by way of truth)

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Satya
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Asteya

Asteya (Non Stealing)-not to take into possession, anything that is not willingly offered. It is the strict adherence to one's own possessions without desiring for the ones that belong to others. One should remain satisfied by whatever is earned through honest labour. Any attempt to squeeze material wealth from others and/or exploit the weak is considered theft.

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Asteya
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Bramacharya

Bramacharya (Chastity)- to exercise control over senses (including mind) from indulgence. The basic intent of this vow is to conquer passion, thus preventing wastage of energy in the direcition of pleasurable desires.

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Bramacharya
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Aparigraha

Aparigraha (Non- possessiveness)- to observe detachment from people, places and material things. Ownership of an object itself is not possessiveness; however, attachment to the owned object is possessiveness. For householders, non-possession is owning without attachment, because the notion of possession is illusory. The basic principle behind observance of this vow lies in the fact that life changes. What you own today may not be rightfully yours tomorrow. Hence the householder is encouraged to discharge his or her duties to related people and objects as a trustee, without excessive attachment or aversion. For monks and nuns, non-possession involves complete renunciation of property and human relations.

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Aparigraha
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