Hygiene and Sanitation in India

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Unfortunately sanitation and hygiene is severely lacking in India, and can be the cause of many problems and illness. Image courtesy: auroville.org

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Waste in India:

Waste management is a major problem in India. Faced with rapid population growth, disorganization of city governments, a lack of public awareness and limited funding for programs, cities have struggled for years to find a way to responsibly manage the country’s ever-increasing amount of trash. The country’s poorly organized waste management scheme continues to result in serious health problems and irreversible damage to the environment. The government, industry and citizens need to work together to make major improvements. Image courtesy: article.wn.com

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Waste in India:
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Currently, there is no official system for the widespread collection of recyclables, and the tasks of collecting, transporting and disposing of waste are done under very unsanitary conditions. These problems have been created in part by low budgets and a lack of technology and manpower. Image courtesy: unbiasedwriter.com

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Pollution in India:

It is not just India’s big cities which are grappling with air pollution, air pollution also is worsening in smaller cities. The main culprit, is the growing number of vehicles in India. While the country still has far fewer vehicles per capita than developed nations, India’s cars are more polluting. Image courtesy: againstpollutioncetis44.blogspot.com

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Pollution in India:
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Pollution in India:

India’s reliance on coal and polluting industries like brick-making that are located close to densely-populated areas. Emission standards are nearly “10 years behind European standards, and these standards are not legally enforceable, unlike in countries like the United States which has the Clean Air Act. India has an Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 which is supposed to be enforced by the Central Pollution Control Board. This act lacks teeth. Image courtesy: facenfacts.com

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Pollution in India:
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Water and Sanitation:

Water supply and sanitation in India continue to be inadequate, despite longstanding efforts by the various levels of government and communities at improving coverage. The level of investment in water and sanitation, albeit low by international standards, has increased during the 2000s. Image courtesy: blog.usaid.gov

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Water and Sanitation:
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Water and Sanitation:

A number of innovative approaches to improve water supply and sanitation have been tested in India, in particular in the early 2000s. These include demand-driven approaches in rural water supply since 1999, community-led total sanitation, a public-private partnerships to improve the continuity of urban water supply in Karnataka, and the use of micro-credit to women in order to improve access to water. Image courtesy: blogs.reuters.com

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Water and Sanitation:
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Sanitation:

Most Indians depend on on-site sanitation facilities. Recently, access to on-site sanitation have increased in both rural and urban areas. In urban areas, a good practice is the Slum Sanitation Program in Mumbai that has provided access to sanitation for a quarter million slum dwellers. Sewerage, where available, is often in a bad state. Of the 2.5 Billion people in the world that defecate openly, some 665 million live in India. This is of greater concern as 88% of deaths from diarrhoea occur because of unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. Image courtesy: http://www.encyclopedia.com

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Sanitation:
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Toilets in India:

Nearly half of India's 1.2 billion people have no toilet at home. Unfortunately one of India’s major problems is its severe lack of public toilets, which is blamed for the common sight of men relieving themselves on the side of the street. In addition, the public toilets that are provided are usually dirty and not well maintained. Image courtesy: constructionweekonline.com

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Toilets in India:
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Slums in India:

India is urbanizing very fast and along with this, the slum population is also increasing. India's urban population is increasing at a faster rate than its total population. With over 575 million people, India will have 41% of its population living in cities and towns by 2030 from the present level of 286 million and 28%. Image courtesy: chieforganizer.org

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Slums in India:
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Slums in India:

Among the urban poor, the slum dwellers are the poorest. The very definition of slums points at the acute drinking water and sanitation crisis for the slum dwellers. A slum in India is defined as 'a cluster inside urban areas without having water and sanitation access'. Image courtesy: 123rf.com

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Slums in India:
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