New Year across India

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Bihu

Rongali Bihu, also called Bohag Bihu, the most popular Bihu celebrates the onset of the Assamese New Year (around April 15) and the coming of Spring and there is happiness all around. It also marks the advent of seeding time. Image Courtesy: www.wikipedia.org

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Bihu
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Ugadi

Ugadi is celebrated as New Year's Day in Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. The name Ugadi is derived from the name "Yuga Adi", which means 'the beginning of a new age'. It is celebrated on the first day of the Hindu month Chaitra, which marks the onset of spring. It is believed that Lord Brahma, the creator according to Hindu mythology, began creation on this day. Preparations begin well ahead of the festival. Houses are given a thorough cleaning, people don new clothes and special dishes are prepared. Image Courtesy: www.hindu.com

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Ugadi
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Gudi Padwa

Gudi Padwa is celebrated as New Year's Day in Maharashtra. It is celebrated on the same day as Ugadi, the first day of the month Chaitra. Courtyards of rural houses are cleaned and plastered with fresh cowdung. Rangolis are drawn on doorsteps. People wear new clothes and special dishes are prepared. Lord Brahma is worshipped on this day and the gudi, Brahma's flag (also called Brahmadhvaj), is hoisted in every house as a symbolic representation of Rama's victory over Ravana. Image Courtesy: www.wikipedia.org

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Gudi Padwa
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Puthandu

Puthandu, also known as Varsha pirappu, is celebrated as New Year's Day in Tamil Nadu. It is celebrated on the first day of the Tamil month Chithirai, which falls on 14 April. Women draw patterns called kolams (similar to Rangoli). A lamp is placed on the center of the kolam, to eradicate darkness. A ritual called kanni meaning 'auspicious sight' takes place. People watch jewellery, fruits, vegetables, flowers, nuts, rice etc., as it is a belief among Tamil people that it brings prosperity. People wear new clothes and special dishes are prepared for the occasion. Image Courtesy: www.indianetzone.com

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Puthandu
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Vishu

Vishu is celebrated as New Year's Day in Kerala. It is celebrated on the first day of the Malayalam month of Medam. Offerings are neatly arranged on the eve of the festival and consist of rice, linen, cucumber, betel leaves, holy texts, coins and flowers. A lamp is placed alongside. It is considered auspicious to see the offerings first thing in the morning. On this day, people read the Ramayana and go to temples. Children burst crackers, people wear new clothes and prepare special dishes and the elders of the house give out money to the children, servants and tenants. Image Courtesy: www.wikipedia.org

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Vishu
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Cheiraoba

Cheiraoba is celebrated as New Year's Day in Manipur. Sajibu Cheiraoba is an annual religious celebration in which certain rites and rituals are observed with a traditional devotion. The celebration marks the parting of the old year while welcoming the new year. The name 'Cheiraoba' is a combination of two words which have two different meanings 'Chahi' (year) and 'laoba' (declaration). Cheiraoba falls on the same day as Ugadi or Gudi Padwa. Image Courtesy: www.4.bp.blogspot.com

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Cheiraoba
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Navreh

Navreh is the lunar new year which is celebrated in Kashmir. This coincides with the first day of the Chaitra (spring) Navratras. This day finds mention in Rajtarangini and Nilamat Purana of Kashmir and is regarded as sacred in Kashmir as the Shivratri. Navreh falls on the same day as Ugadi or Cheiraoba or Gudi Padwa. Image Courtesy: www.walkthroughindia.com

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Navreh
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Maha vishuva Sankranti

Mahavishuva Sankranti, is celebrated as the Oriya New Year. On this day, religious people offer delicious Pana, a sweet drink made of different types of fruits, water, milk, bela, curd and sugar or jaggery to the Tulsi Plant. During the festival you will find water pots placed on the roadsides to help the thirsty souls. Water is also offered to animals and birds. This Sankraniti is also known as Pana Sankranit (Water Sankranti). On the concluding day some people discipline their senses by penance, walking on fire and thorns to concentrate on spirituality for the dignity and propriety of life. Mahabishuba Sankranti generally falls on 13 or 14 April. Image Courtesy: www.files.wordpress.com

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Maha vishuva Sankranti
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Bestu Varas

Bestu Varas is the New Year's day for Gujrati's and this falls on the day next to Diwali. Bestu Baras generally falls in month of October or November. The day starts with the heavy fire works, to welcome New Year. The local young boys sells raw salt calling it "sabras" means all taste, to make the locals' new year prosperous. Houses are decorated with the marigolds flower garland and rangoli beside the front door. Home made snacks are offered to the guests and neighbors who come to wish New Year. Image Courtesy: www.walkthroughindia.com

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Bestu Varas
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Cheti Chand

Cheti Chand is celebrated as New Year's Day by Sindhis, According to the Hindu calendar, Cheti Chand is celebrated on the second day of the Chaitra month known as Chet in Sindhi. Hence it is known as CHET-I-CHAND. It is the second day of month chaitra, a day after Ugadi and Gudi Padi. Image Courtesy: www.walkthroughindia.com

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Cheti Chand
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Chaitti and Basoa / Bishu

The festivals of Chaitti and Basoa are celebrated as New Year festivals in the state of Himachal Pradesh. Chaitti is celebrated on the first day of month of Chaitra which according to the Bikram Samwat is the first day of year. The first day of this month (Chaitra Sankranti) is considered very important and is celebrated all over the state. Chaitti is cebrated on the same day as Ugadi and Gudi Padwa. A ritual song is sung on this occasion. Image Courtesy: www.ezccindia.org

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Chaitti and Basoa / Bishu
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Pohela Boishakh

Pohela Boishakh or Poila Boishakh is the first day of the Bengali calendar, celebrated in both Bangladesh and West Bengal, and in Bengali communities in Assam and Tripura. It is the day after Vishuva Sankranti, also known as Choitro (Chaitra) Sankrati in Bengali. Pohela Boishakh connects all ethnic Bengalis irrespective of religious and regional differences. It falls on 14 or 15 April of the Gregorian calendar depending on the use of the new amended or the old Bengali calendar respectively. In Bangladesh, it is celebrated on 14 April according to the official amended calendar designed by the Bangla Academy. Image Courtesy: www.wikimedia.org

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Pohela Boishakh
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Baisakhi

Baisakhi Festival, also called Vaisakhi, holds great importance for the Sikh community and farmers of Punjab. Baisakhi falls on 13 or 14 April, the first day of the year according to the Nanakshahi Calender. Sikhs also celebrate this day in honor of their tenth guru, Guru Gobind Singh. Baisakhi commemorates the day when the Sikh Guru eliminated caste differences and founded Khalsa Panth in 1699. Image Courtesy: www.walkthroughindia.com

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Baisakhi
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