Unbelievable ability to fly...

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Bat

Bats are the only mammals capable of sustaining level flight. Bats fly much like birds. But, they do not have feathers, they don't build nests, or lay eggs rather their bodies are covered with fur. The wings of a bat are made of bones like those bones in our arms and hands. The long arm bones and extra-long finger bones are covered with skin. The membrane gives the wing a stiff edge like that of an airplane. When the large muscles give powerful wing strokes flight becomes possible.

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Bat
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Bee

Bees move their wings rapidly at 200 beats per second, which is 10 or 20 times the firing rate of the nervous system. The trick apparently is that the bee's wing muscles don't expand and contract. A nerve impulse comes along and twangs the muscle, much as you might pluck a guitar string, and it vibrates the wing up and down a few times until the next impulse comes along. A bee doesn't take off in the same manner as an airplane does. An airplane soars quickly through the air and the air provides lift. A bee simply pushes air downwards, sort of like a helicopter.

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Bee
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Snake

"Flying" snakes also use mobile ribs to flatten their body into an aerodynamic shape, with a back and forth motion much the same as they use on the ground. To prepare for take-off, a flying snake will slither to the end of a branch, and dangle in a 'J' shape. It propels itself from the branch with the lower half of its body, forms quickly into an S, and flattens to about twice its normal width, giving its normally round body a concave C shape, which can trap air. By undulating back and forth, the snake can actually make turns.

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Snake
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Frog

A "flying" frog is a frog that has the ability to glide. The flying frog of Asia has both front and hind feet webbed, and uses them to glide from trees to the ground.

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Frog
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Lizard

They have a thin membrane that extends down their rib cage. When they make their leap, they extend their front limbs forward into a stream line position. Their back legs fold back into an angle to direct their 'flight'. They also have a smaller membrane on their neck that acts as a stabilizer.

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Lizard
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Flying Squirrel

Flying squirrels are not capable of powered flight like birds or bats; instead, they glide between trees. The direction and speed of the animal mid-air is varied by changing the positions of its two arms and legs, largely controlled by small cartilaginous wrist bones. It has a fluffy tail that stabilizes in flight. The tail acts as an adjunct airfoil, working as an air brake before landing on a tree trunk.

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Flying Squirrel
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Flying Fish

Flying fish can glide using enlarged wing-like fins, and have been observed soaring for hundreds of meters. It is thought that this ability was chosen by natural selection because it was an effective means of escape from underwater predators. The longest recorded flight of a flying fish was 45 seconds.

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Flying Fish
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The Spruce Goose

Many were convinced that this plane would not even get off the water. It was of a size never before seen, with no fewer than eight engines and a 100 metre wingspan. But the 'Spruce Goose' did fly...it's one and only flight was in 1947, where it flew for around a mile, reaching altitude of 70 feet. It also holds records for the largest wingspan at 97.5 meters, tallest airplane at 24.2 meters,and the largest aircraft ever made from wood.

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The Spruce Goose
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