Frog - The ultimate amphibian

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Varieties

There are over 3,000 different species of frogs and toads, sporting just about every color in the rainbow. Image Courtesy: www.voxcdn.com

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Varieties
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Cold blooded

Like all amphibians, frogs are cold-blooded, meaning that their body temperatures change with the temperature of their surroundings. Image Courtesy: www.sheppardsoftware.com

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Cold blooded
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Ability to Hibernate

When temperatures drop, some frogs dig burrows underground or in the mud at the bottom of ponds, this is called hibernation. Image Courtesy: www.aitc.sk.ca

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Ability to Hibernate
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Leap frog

Frogs have a reputation for leaping that is well deserved. Launched by their long legs, many frogs can leap up to twenty times their body length. Image Courtesy: www.crazyfrogss.com

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Leap frog
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Transfomation

Tadpoles undergo a change in body structure called metamorphosis (transformation from swimming tadpole to hopping frog). Image Courtesy: www.ourclassweb.com

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Transfomation
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Feet Structure

A frog's two front legs have four toes each, while the back legs have five toes each. Aquatic frogs have long, strong legs with webbed back feet to help them swim. Frogs that live on land tend to have shorter legs for walking. Tree frogs have large, round toe pads, like suction cups, that help them cling to branches.

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Feet Structure
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Food

Frogs eat almost any live prey they can find, including insects, snails, spiders, and worms, or small fish. Image Courtesy: www.king.portlandschools.org

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Food
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How they capture prey

A frog catches insects with a long sticky tongue. It takes less than a second for a frog's tongue to roll out, adhere to prey, and roll back into the frog's mouth. Image Courtesy: www.soak-blog.andrewkelsalldes.netdna-cdn.com

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How they capture prey
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Moisture

Frogs get all the moisture they need through their skin. Frog skin secretes mucus that helps keep it moist. Image Courtesy: www.4.bp.blogspot.com

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Moisture
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Poison

All frogs have poison glands in their skin. In most cases, these toxins aren't strong enough. Toads have poison glands behind their eyes that ooze a milky poisonous fluid. Even in its mildest form it causes a burning sensation if it gets in the eyes or mouth of a predator. Image Courtesy: www.californiaherps.com

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Poison
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Save the Frog

Frogs are facing population decline largely as a result of human activities, like habitat destruction and environmental pollution. Image Courtesy: www.bromer.com

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Save the Frog
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