Extinct Animals

Image
02

Tasmanian Wolf

The Tasmanian Wolf is not a wolf, but a carnivorous marsupial and a relative of wombats and kangaroos. It even has a pouch. It is believed to be extinct for well over half a century however unconfirmed reported sightings persist.

01
Tasmanian Wolf
02

Quagga

Quagga, Equus burchelli quagga, of the Karoo Plains and southern Free State of South Africa were a subspecies of the Burchellâ Zebra, although their unique appearance wouldn't necessarily make this apparent. Some thought incorrectly that the Quagga was the female of Burchell's Zebra, probably because the natives gave both zebras the same name. In the wild, Quaggas, Ostriches and wildebeests often grazed together in what was termed the "triple alliance". The last Quagga died in in 1883 in an Amsterdam Zoo.

01
Quagga
02

Caspian Tigers

Caspian Tigers lived in China, Tajikistan, Iran, Afghanistan and Turkey. They were hunted for their furs and to protect livestock. A ban on hunting the Caspian Tiger in the USSR in 1947 followed their greatest destruction in the 1930s. The last Caspian Tiger reportedly was shot in 1957.

01
Caspian Tigers
02

Dodos

In 1505, Portuguese explorers discovered the island of Mauritius and the 50 lb flightless Dodos which supplemented their food stores. Imported pigs, monkeys and rats fed on the Dodo's eggs in their ground nests. The last Dodo was killed in 1681.

01
Dodos
02

Smilodon

Also known as the saber tooth cats, Smilodon's lived in Europe and North America. They were fast runners for short distances and probably ambushed their prey in packs. The Hoplophoneus species lived 20 million years ago. The Smilodon species lived during the Pleistocene from 1.6 million years ago to 10,000 years ago when it became extinct.

01
Smilodon
02

American Mastodons

American Mastodons lived about 15 million years ago and became extinct about 6,000 years ago. They stood about 10 feet tall, ate grass, leaves and water plants of the lowlands and swamps which they roamed.

01
American Mastodons
02

Woolly Mammoth

The Woolly Mammoths were about 11 feet tall and lived in the Arctic Regions of Europe, Asia and North America in the Pleistocene (1.8 million to 11 thousand years ago) and became extinct between 5000 and 10,000 years ago.

01
Woolly Mammoth
02

The Giant Ground Sloth

The Giant Ground Sloth, Megatherium americanum, was 18 feet long, as big as an elephant, and lived in South America during the Pleistocene until just a few thousand years ago. Other species from the size of a cat to that of the the giant ground sloth lived from the Arctic to Antarctica. They were hunted by humans and some believe humans may even have farmed them.

01
The Giant Ground Sloth
02

Giant Turtle Archelon

The Giant Turtle Archelon was a slow moving creature of the ancient seas during the Cretaceous (65 to 146 million years ago). Some remains measure over 15 feet long. Like many of today's turtles it ate jellyfish and expired drifting fish as well as plants, buried its eggs in sandy beaches, and may have lived more than 100 years.

01
Giant Turtle Archelon
02

Giant Moa

Giant Moa: The Māori arrived sometime before A.D. 1300, and all moa genera were soon driven to extinction by hunting and, to a lesser extent, forest clearance. By about A.D. 1400 almost all Moa are generally thought to have become extinct, along with the Haast's Eagle which had relied on them for food.

01
Giant Moa
02

Haasta's Eagle

Haast's Eagle was a species of massive eagles that once lived on the South Island of New Zealand. The species was the largest eagle known to have existed. Its prey consisted mainly of gigantic flightless birds that were unable to defend themselves from the striking force and speed of these eagles, which at times reached 80 km/h (50 mph). The Haast's Eagle became extinct about 1400, when its major food sources, the moa, were hunted to extinction by humans living on the island and much of its dense-forest habitat was cleared.

01
Haasta's Eagle
Share facebook twitter gplus

Related Slideshows