Bengali Sweets

Image
02

Bengali Sweets

Sweets or 'Mishti' occupy an important place in the diet of Bengalis and at their social ceremonies. It is an ancient custom among both Hindu and Muslim Bengalis to distribute sweets during festivities. Image Courtesy-indianfood.about.com

01
Bengali Sweets
02

Bengali Sweets

The sweets of Bengal are generally made of sweetened cottage cheese (chhena), unlike the use of khoa (reduced solidified milk) in Northern India. Image Courtesy-sodahead.com

01
Bengali Sweets
02

Shondesh

Made from sweetened, finely ground fresh chhena (cottage cheese), shondesh in all its variants is among the most popular Bengali sweets. Image Courtesy-ifood.tv

01
Shondesh
02

Shondesh

The basic shondesh has been considerably enhanced by the many famous confectioners of Bengal, and now a few hundred different varieties exist, from the simple kachagolla to the complicated abar khabo, jolbhora or indrani. Image Courtesy-shutterstock.com

01
Shondesh
02

Shondesh

Another variant is the korapak or hard mixture, which blends rice flour with the paneer to form a shell-like dough that last much longer. Image Courtesy-purabibengalifood.blogspot.com

01
Shondesh
02

Roshogolla

Roshogolla is one of the most widely consumed sweets. The basic version has many regional variations. Though this sweet has been primarily borrowed from Orissa, Nabin Chandra Das is considered to have "invented" it in Bengal. Image Courtesy-sharmispassions.com

01
Roshogolla
02

Laddu

Laddu is a very common sweet in Bangladesh and West Bengal, especially during celebrations and festivities. Image Courtesy-spicingyourlife.blogspot.com

01
Laddu
02

Pantua

Pantua is somewhat similar to the roshogolla, except that the cottage cheese balls are fried in either ghee (clarified butter) or oil until golden or deep brown before being put in syrup. Image Courtesy-sindhirasoi.com

01
Pantua
02

Pantua

There are similar tasting, but differently shaped versions of the Pantua e.g. Langcha (cylindrical) or Ledikeni. Image Courtesy-bangalinet.com

01
Pantua
02

Chomchom

Chomchom, (originally from Porabari, Tangail District in Bangladesh) goes back about 150 years. Image Courtesy-bangalinet.com

01
Chomchom
02

Chomchom

The modern version of this oval-shaped sweet is reddish brown in colour and has a denser texture than the roshogolla. Image Courtesy-spicingyourlife.blogspot.com

01
Chomchom
02

Chomchom

Granules of maoa or dried milk can also be sprinkled over chomchom. Image Courtesy-ifood.tv

01
Chomchom
02

Pitha or pithe

In both Bangladesh and West Bengal, the tradition of making different kinds of pan-fried, steamed or boiled sweets, lovingly known as piţhe or the "pitha", still flourishes. These little balls of heaven symbolizes the coming of winter, and the arrival of a season where rich food can be included in the otherwise mild diet of the Bengalis... the richness lie in the creamy silkiness of the milk which is mixed often with molasses, or jaggery made of either date palm or sugarcane, and sometimes sugar. They are mostly divided into different categories based on the way they are created. Generally rice flour goes into making the pithe. Image Courtesy-kitchenbits-n-bytes.com

01
Pitha or pithe
02

Pitha or pithe

They are usually fried or steamed; the most common forms of these cakes include bhapa piţha (steamed), pakan piţha (fried), and puli piţha (dumplings), among others. The other common pithas are chandrapuli, gokul, pati shapta, chitai piţha, aski pithe, muger puli and dudh puli. Image Courtesy-bengalirecipes4u.wordpress.com

01
Pitha or pithe
02

Pati Shapta

The Pati Shapta variety is basically a thin-layered rice-flour crepes with a milk-custard creme-filling, very weirdly similar to the hoppers or appams of South India, or the French crepes. Image Courtesy-kichukhonn.blogspot.com

01
Pati Shapta
02

Chhanar Jileepi

It is a desert made with paneer and resembles the Indian sweet Jalebi. Image Courtesy-kcdas.co.in

01
Chhanar Jileepi
02

Kalo Jam

If you have a sweet tooth for gulab jamun then Kalo jam is just the right treat for you. Kalo jam tastes quite like gulab jamun but is slightly more fried than than it. Image Courtesy-sweetkaramkapi.blogspot.com

01
Kalo Jam
02

Darbesh

Sweat balls made from Bonde. A very tasty Ladoo - really difficult to resist eating a dozen at a time! Image Courtesy-neivedyam.com

01
Darbesh
02

Payesh

Payesh tastes a lot like Phirni. The only difference is that the rice is not granulated and whole rice is used. Image Courtesy-imagejuicy.com

01
Payesh
02

Nalengurer Shondesh

This sweet is a typical Bengali sweet " it is made from a special type of sweetener called 'nalen gur'. Image Courtesy-flickr.com

01
Nalengurer Shondesh
Share facebook twitter gplus

Related Slideshows