Position and Usage of Adjectives

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Position and Usage of Adjectives

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Position and Usage of Adjectives
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Position of Adjectives

An Adjective used attributively is generally placed immediately before the noun. Observe the difference in meaning between:- (i) a great nobleman's son, and (ii) a nobleman's great son.

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Position of Adjectives
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Position of Adjectives

In poetry, however, the Adjective is frequently placed after the noun; as shown in the below slide:

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Position of Adjectives
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Position of Adjectives

When several Adjectives are attached to one noun they are sometimes placed after it for emphasis; as shown in the below slide:

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Position of Adjectives
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Position of Adjectives

When some word or phrase is joined to the Adjective to explain its meaning, the Adjective is placed after its noun; as shown in the below slide:

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Position of Adjectives
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Position of Adjectives

In certain phrases the Adjective always comes after the noun; as shown in the below slide:

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Position of Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

To express quantity or degree 'some' is used normally in affirmative sentences, 'any' in negative or interrogative sentences.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

'Any' can be used after if in affirmative sentences.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

'Some' is used in questions which are really offers/requests or which expect the answer “yes”.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

'Each' and 'every' are similar in meaning, but 'every' is a stronger word than 'each'; it means, 'each without exception'. 'Each' is used in speaking of two or more things; 'every' is used only in speaking of more than two. 'Each' directs attention to the individuals forming any group, 'every' to the total group. 'Each' is used only when the number in the group is limited and definite; 'every' when the number is indefinite.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

Note carefully the use of - (1) Little = not much (i.e., hardly any). Thus, the adjective little has a negative meaning. There is little hope of his recovery, i.e., he is not likely to recover.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

(2) A little = some though not much. 'A little' has a positive meaning - There is a little hope of his recovery, i.e., he may possibly recover.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

(3) The little = not much, but all there is. The little knowledge of carpentry that he possessed stood him in good stead. [The sentence means-The knowledge of carpentry he possessed was not much; but all that knowledge stood him in good stead.]

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

Note carefully the use of :- (1) Few = not many, hardly any, 'Few' has a negative meaning.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

(2) A few = some. 'A few' has a positive meaning, and is opposed to 'none'.

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives

The few = not many, but all there are. The few remarks that he made were very suggestive. [The sentence means - The remarks that he made were not many; but all those remarks were very suggestive.]

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The Correct Use of Some Adjectives
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