Noun: Case - Part 2

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When two nouns are in apposition, the possessive sign is put to the latter only.

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When two nouns are closely connected, the possessive is put to the latter.

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Each of the two or more connected nouns implying separate possession must take the possessive sign.

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Use of Possessive Case: The Possessive Case is now used chiefly with the names of living things.

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So we must say:

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The Possessive is used with the names personified objects.

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The Possessive is also used with nouns denoting time, space or weight.

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Common Phrases:

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The possessive of a proper name or of a noun denoting a trade, profession or relationship may be used to denote a building or place of business (church, house, school, shop, hospital, theater, etc.).

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When in doubt whether to use a noun in the possessive case or with the preposition of, as a general rule, the possessive case is used to denote possession or ownership.

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However, a noun in the possessive case has a different meaning from a noun used with the preposition of. 'The Prime Minister's reception in Delhi' means a reception held by the Prime Minister in Delhi. 'The reception of the Prime Minister in Delhi' means means the manner in which the people welcomed him when he entered Delhi.

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Nouns in Apposition: In the below sentence, 'Raju' and 'our captain' are the same person. The noun captain follows the noun Raju simply to explain which Raju is referred to. When one noun follows another to describe it, the noun which follows is said to be in apposition to the noun which comes before it. (Apposition means placing near.) A noun in apposition is in the same case as the noun which it explains. In the below sentence the noun captain is in apposition to the noun Raju and is in the Nominative Case (because Raju is in the Nominative Case.

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