Question
Fri March 19, 2010 By: Vg Aishwainee

control and coordination

Expert Reply
Fri March 19, 2010

Smell, like taste, is a chemical sense detected by sensory cells called chemoreceptors. When an odorant, like smell of incense stick, stimulates the chemoreceptors in the nose that detect smell, they pass on electrical impulses to the brain. The brain then interprets patterns in electrical activity as specific odors and olfactory sensation becomes perception -- something we can recognize as smell. But smell, more so than any other sense, is also intimately linked to the parts of the brain that process emotion and associative learning. (The olfactory bulb in the brain, which sorts sensation into perception, is part of the limbic system.)

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