Question
Wed September 28, 2011 By: Rashi Agrawal
 

How does our body work? It sends some electric signals to various parts of the body.Is this an example of current electricity?

Expert Reply
Mon October 03, 2011

Everything we do is controlled and enabled by electrical signals running through our bodies. As we know, everything is made up of atoms, and atoms are made up of protons, neutrons and electrons. Protons have a positive charge, neutrons have a neutral charge, and electrons have a negative charge. When these charges are out of balance, an atom becomes either positively or negatively charged. The switch between one type of charge and the other allows electrons to flow from one atom to another. This flow of electrons, or a negative charge, is what we call electricity. Since our bodies are huge masses of atoms, we can generate electricity.

When we talk about the nervous system sending "signals" to the brain, or the brain telling our hands to contract around a door handle, what we're talking about is electricity carrying messages between point A and point B. Except in our bodies, electrons aren't flowing along a wire; instead, an electrical charge is jumping from one cell to the next until it reaches its destination.

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